Canadian Stories

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Read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact.

Read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact.

 

What do you love best about Canadian culture & creativity?

Thank you

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • Their Story, Our Story : Yiddish Women Writers

    by frieda johles forman, about 2 years ago

    Thanks to Canada's respect and support for diverse cultural expression, the works of Yiddish women writers were introduced, in translation, to a large Anglophone readership. Two published volumes of stories featuring Canadian Yiddish writers established Canada's reputation as a pioneer in multi-cultural literary exploration and creativity.

    It must be noted that these translations of women's literature from Yiddish are the first such collections and are included in university curricula across the globe.

    Our translating group could not have done it without the encouragement and funding we received from Canadian arts councils.

    The collections mentioned: :

    "Found Treasures : Stories by... Continue reading

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  • Second life for an unknown writer

    by John F Brooke, about 2 years ago

    This is not a particularly Canadian-culture story per se – my fictional cop Inspector Aliette Nouvelle is French. But I am a Canadian writer, from Toronto, living in Montreal, fortunate to have published 8 books. The message I would like to share is that for those of us who are not supported by major Toronto publisher PR budgets: The best way forward is LOCAL.

    My books are published by a small publisher in Winnipeg, operating on an accordingly small PR budget. Being far away in Montreal and never been great at “selling myself”, there is too... Continue reading

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  • Vimy

    by Barbara DeLory, about 2 years ago

    The Vimy Monument had its beginnings in 1920 with a competition for a monument that could incorporate some sculpture. The Canadian Battlefields Memorial Commission announced its winner, Walter Allward on October 1921. The site would be Vimy Ridge. Allward was well know sculptor, having worked on Toronto’s Northwest Rebellion monument and Boer War Memorial in 1910. He envisioned the Vimy Memorials quickly – one reads as in a dream. There would be twenty symbolic figures of virtues associated with war-faith, justice, peace and hope.

    Laura Brandon tells us in her essay “Making Memory: Canvas of War and the... Continue reading

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  • Lest we forget

    by Mumbles, about 2 years ago
    Smallsoldierpic

    You may not recognize him. He doesn't always wear his uniform. We're not always at war. Not always. He raised the flag on Canada Day and looked through me. I was immediately taken away from that moment looking into his eyes and these three words resonated in my memories in class talking about the struggles of war and the horrors of living through it. People love this man, but there is a part of him that is damaged and I get the feeling he too knows why we must never forget.

    Dulce bellum inexpertis.

    War is sweet that have not... Continue reading

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  • Wrong Question?

    by Munroe Scott, about 2 years ago

    The question could be “What do you not love about Canadian Culture?”I have read the Consultation Paper and cannot help being transfixed by an underlying paradox that verges on the hypocritical. Yes, I love Canadian culture and for almost sixty years as a freelance filmwriter/playwright/author I have attempted to both display it and enhance it. It is tempting to philosophize about where we should go in the brave new digital world, but digital or non-digital it may be more helpful if I tell one small anecdote about one small book.Several years ago I wrote a creative non-fiction book about our... Continue reading

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  • Reflections on digital technology, government and the loss of cultural space to entertainment.

    by Jose Latour, about 2 years ago

    The problems that Canadian culture confronts, in my opinion, are identical to those that the cultures of many other countries meet head-on. One issue that almost everyone accepts but it is insufficiently explored, or never mentioned, is that numerous forms of entertainment have displaced and occupied a huge part of the space that literature, the arts and classical and neo-classical music, opera and theatrical productions occupied a hundred years earlier. To provide a rationale for that point I find it necessary to (1) extend the analysis beyond Canada and (2) go back in history.

    In the late 19th century, in... Continue reading

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  • My Story

    by Mary Mason, about 2 years ago

    Writing has always been what I do. As an undergrad on The Varsity in the old days when we published the paper ourselves overnight on the U of T press in the basement of the Chem building, then as an art, music and drama critic on the Hamilton Spectator, on and on as a contributing editor to a few magazines, Canadian and US, a commissioned biography of Samuel Weir Q.C. and then an award winning book about my father, the composer Healey Willan, published by Words in Print.

    Upon finding an English translation of a short history, published in Montreal... Continue reading

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  • Securing an independent voice

    by Cliff Burns, about 2 years ago

    I became an independent publisher by choice.

    And note that I use the term "independent publisher", rather than "self-publisher" because the distinction is an important one.

    I have dozens of professional credits and make great efforts to ensure my writing is innovative, literate and original. I place the bar high, aesthetically speaking, straining to always meet the highest possible literary standards. My books are meticulously edited, carefully vetted. THAT'S what makes me an "independent publisher".

    A "self-publisher" writes poems about a beloved pet chihuahua or fan fiction based on their favourite idiotic TV series.

    I was forced to publish my... Continue reading

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  • Everyday People Cartoons by Cathy Thorne

    by Cathy Thorne, about 2 years ago
    439

    I’m one of the few lucky Canadians to make a living in the comic arts. Not a great living, mind you, but a living — and one that I love.

    I created my first cartoon in 1999 and since then have enjoyed seeing my work published around the world in print and online in newspapers, magazines, books, big and small brand marketing campaigns and a variety of licensed products.

    The internet has been good to me. It offers me the freedom to create what I want, and gives me direct access to the people who enjoy... Continue reading

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  • AMAZING MEDICAL STORIES OUT OF CANADA

    by Geordie, about 2 years ago

    I have been a freelance writer in a variety of genres for the past 25 years. My only book effort was co-authored with Dorothy Grant entitled Amazing Medical Stories (ISBN-10: 0864923473) which outlines some of the outstanding achievements (and debacles) of a medical nature in Canada or associated with Canadians. It all started when I visited the Parrsboro Geological Museum and found out that a GP from Parrsboro invented kerosene and set up the first petro-chemical plant in the world for Esso. This excited the detective in me and I hunted down other interesting stories, a passion shared with Nova... Continue reading

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