Canadian Stories

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Read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact.

Read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact.

 

What do you love best about Canadian culture & creativity?

Thank you

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • Celebrating Uniqueness

    by Anik, over 2 years ago

    Canadian culture is, like other cultures, incredibly unique, and arts funding helps support it. Whether it's a novel about ice by Thomas Wharton, or performances by A Tribe Called Red, or funding residencies for new Canadian artists in every discipline, I'm convinced our culture wouldn't be nearly as well-represented both nationally and internationally without support on municipal, provincial and national levels. Artists take pride in the work they do (usually with little to no remuneration) and when they receive additional support it encourages them to keep going. I love that, with the help of funding, Canadian artists seem to sell... Continue reading

  • My Most Unusual Publication

    by Harries-Jones, over 2 years ago

    Peter Harries-Jones .I have myself have published several books in the academic world, one of them short listed for a major Canadian non-fiction prize, and my wife, Rosalind Gill, has translated and published books written in French, has written short stories in English for major Canadian literary journals, and is about to publish a book of short stories set in Newfoundland. But our most unusual publishing enterprise was as joint editors of a Tai Chi manual. Part of the manual demonstrated in pictures and text one of the four main styles of Tai Chi, in this case Tai Chi Chuan... Continue reading

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  • My passion for telling Canada's stories

    by Jane Harris, over 2 years ago

    As an author, I love telling Canadian stories, whether they are about history or still unfolding, whether they are happy or sad, whether they are about things we can be proud of or things that we need to change.

    I also love hearing the stories others share with me in their work, or when they read my work. I am deeply touched when readers tell me that my writing helps them understand this country and its people a little better.

    Over the years, my work has changed a great deal, moving from straight journalism, to creative non-fiction books about history,... Continue reading

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  • My story and theirs: a Jamaican-Canadian artist living in Newfoundland

    by ANGELA BAKER, over 2 years ago
    • My story and theirs: A Jamaican-Canadian artist in Newfoundland.

    I was born (1941) and raised in Jamaica, West Indies, and educated in Jamaica, England, Canada and the U.S.A. My family and I migrated and resettled in Corner Brook, Newfoundland in 1976, where I have lived since. My children were born in Jamaica and grew up in Corner Brook, NL. They and my two grandchildren now live in Calgary, Alberta. Being an islander I remain attached to the sea and hills of my adopted island home, with visits to family in the Caribbean.

    I have been settled now in the island... Continue reading

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  • Uncovering the Past

    by Day's Lee, over 2 years ago

    When I was growing up, my parents rarely talked about how they emigrated from China. I only heard bits and pieces when they talked with their friends, or if my father made a comment about a story on the news that reminded him of the past. I’d ask questions. Their answers were vague. Although I took history courses in high school and university, none ever touched on Chinese immigration to Canada. It was only after my parents passed away, did I discover my father’s head tax certificate and other documents that provided a key to their past. I did some... Continue reading

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  • Copy That

    by Kashby, over 2 years ago

    COPY THAT

    I was never sure about being an artist. In my family art was not high up on the 'best-thing-to-do' list, but despite that, art is the path I chose. My dad, whom I adored, never said, "Don't be an artist," and he told me he wanted me to be happy. In 1977, I enrolled in Sheridan College's design program and majored in glass blowing. All through the course and my career, doubt haunted me. Did I make the right decision? Why is it so hard to make a living? Why don't I get any respect?

    ... Continue reading

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  • I think one has to appreciate the Canadian arts directly and personally because so much is lost through the distorting filters of the CBC, Maclean's, M&S, universities, and various sponsored events. The arts scenes I found most valuable were in the Atlan

    by BOUNCER, over 2 years ago

    The tsunami of the digital age has washed over us and now seems receding - thank god. But what do we have left but wreckage? For many years, the strippers were our most popular live entertainment and we had some of the best dancers in the West - but the venues are all closed now.

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  • HUMBUG

    by BOUNCER, over 2 years ago

    A lot of the official chat about Canadian culture seems artificial and tiresome - especially on the CBC. Wayne & Schuster, The Royal Canadian Air Farce, and the Mercer Report were never very funny. The best community arts are in Atlantic Canada and Whitehorse: the least interesting are usually in Toronto, the cement suit for innovation - but that's where all the money is. It seems the tsunami of the digital age has washed over us and is now receding - thank god. The most popular of our former entertainers were the strippers and the pubs but most are now... Continue reading

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  • AMAZING MEDICAL STORIES OUT OF CANADA

    by Geordie, over 2 years ago

    I have been a freelance writer in a variety of genres for the past 25 years. My only book effort was co-authored with Dorothy Grant entitled Amazing Medical Stories (ISBN-10: 0864923473) which outlines some of the outstanding achievements (and debacles) of a medical nature in Canada or associated with Canadians. It all started when I visited the Parrsboro Geological Museum and found out that a GP from Parrsboro invented kerosene and set up the first petro-chemical plant in the world for Esso. This excited the detective in me and I hunted down other interesting stories, a passion shared with Nova... Continue reading

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  • Everyday People Cartoons by Cathy Thorne

    by Cathy Thorne, over 2 years ago
    439

    I’m one of the few lucky Canadians to make a living in the comic arts. Not a great living, mind you, but a living — and one that I love.

    I created my first cartoon in 1999 and since then have enjoyed seeing my work published around the world in print and online in newspapers, magazines, books, big and small brand marketing campaigns and a variety of licensed products.

    The internet has been good to me. It offers me the freedom to create what I want, and gives me direct access to the people who enjoy... Continue reading

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