Canadian Stories

Consultations Web portal is now closed to submissions

Read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact.

Read and share your own stories about Canadian digital content, its importance and impact.

 

What do you love best about Canadian culture & creativity?

Thank you

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • How Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Grew a Canadian Writer

    by Girl with a Pen, about 3 years ago

    In a split classroom of grade 2s and 3s (I was in the 2s) my teacher read us Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. I was transported. I knew I wanted to create stories that moved people like that story moved me. Whether it was exploring magic, clarifying a situation or educating others, that's where I longed to hang my hat - or pen, as the case may be.

    It was Canada, the early 1970s and I had no idea what options were available, but I was encouraged and told I could write. It wasn't until a few... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Finding a New Path

    by serimuse, about 3 years ago

    For many years I benefited from being a member of the Saskatchewan writing community. I attended the Summer School of the Arts many years ago, have been a member of the Saskatchewan Writers Guild since the 1980's, took part in workshops, sat on boards, and wrote. I also worked at other jobs because I knew I couldn't make a living 'just writing.' I had work published in small magazines and a couple of anthologies, as well as broadcast on local CBC radio. I won some awards. But I couldn't seem to get a book published. It wasn't until the digital... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • My Creative Non Fiction Trilogy Times Two

    by Lillianne, about 3 years ago

    I have published Independently under the Publishers name of Grassroots Publishing, two trilogies and a separate Historical Novel all about Canadian Adventures in the early days of Canadian/Albertan History. I call it Creative Non-Fiction because they are all true stories that actually took place in Canada/Alberta with the same names, places and time era.

    It's called creative non-fiction because I have added the story with it to bring the characters to life, so that you can know them, understand them, feel, see and hear their conversation. But that is why I have had to label the stories 'Novels' even though... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Accidental Canadian Writer and Historian

    by CynthiaFaryon, about 3 years ago

    Writing wasn't on my radar ... I was a mother, a Provincial Government office worker and aspiring Legal Assistant. In the middle of the busiest time in motherhood, my mother and my aunt were reunited after a 65 year-old separation. My aunt lived in England, my mother an English war bride living in Canada. They were separated by the English orphanage system after my Jewish grandfather and Irish Catholic Grandmother divorced and neither side wanted the two girls. My mother was 6 years old when she "lost" her sister. They were accidently reunited over the telephone by someone living in... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Our stories are unique

    by RJHarlick, about 3 years ago

    Art, books, films and anything else created by Canadians are the only means we have for telling stories that are based on our own unique Canadian experience and view of the world. They reflect the events, the lives, the geography that have shaped and continue to shape us as a people and a country. They help us keep our distinctly Canadian stories alive and enable us to pass our Canadian experiences onto successive generations.

    Sadly, with the rise of the multi-national artistic conglomerates and the continuing demise of independent Canadian artistic businesses, the ability for Canadian artists to tell these... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Punching Above Our Weight

    by DSchmidt, about 3 years ago

    I love that we’re starting to punch above our weight in terms of the amount of quality content that we produce in the Canadian television industry (evidenced by our recent successes in international sales and awards.) Decades ago, Canadian musicians were very much second-class citizens in terms of success on the global stage; now, we’re a powerhouse. With the right policies, we could be saying the same thing about Canadian TV creators in a decade or two.

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • A Life (so far) In Canadian Television

    by Mikperlus, about 3 years ago

    I began my life in Canadian Television at age eleven when I appeared on the series Katts and Dog. I played a young boy who accidentally brushed my teeth with heroin while on a sleepover. Apparently, my choking cough was second to none. The experience was formative and began a love affair with Canadian Television that has lasted nearly thirty years.

    During that time, I worked as an actor on classic Canadian shows like Road to Avonlea and Student Bodies, as a voice actor on numerous Canadian-made cartoons like Sidekick, as a writer and developer of international... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • A Little Classic Canadiana That Really MOVED me..

    by Doug, from the coast, about 3 years ago

    As a kid growing up in Burnaby, BC, like most kids, I was pretty self absorbed and had little knowledge of the world, aside from the big, "newbie" topics. I grew up watching various TV shows, as most of us did, but one in particular stuck with me. It was "The Beachcombers".

    I went through my childhood and most of my adulthood, living and working in the Lower Mainland of BC and eventually worked in many other smaller towns in the province, but would always watch this show when the opportunity presented itself, because the location and lifestyle it showed... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • How My Dieppe Story Made Me Feel More Canadian

    by DMcWriterboy, about 3 years ago
    Screen shot 2016 09 24 at 9.29.59 pm

    I'm an immigrant to this country. I came here from the USA with my parents when I was eight years old.

    Last year, I had the extraordinary opportunity of writing an important episode of my good friends' TV series, "XCOMPANY." The show, for those who don't know it, follows a group of spies behind enemy lines in occupied France in 1942, all trained at the real-life "CAMP X" - which was located near Whitby, Ontario. CAMP X trained, among others, the first several directors of the CIA, and Ian Fleming, who would later write the James... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Canada Has A Relevant Cinematic Voice

    by kseniathurgood, about 3 years ago

    Canada has a relevant cinematic voice. Nothing is more clear than the success of 'Orphan Black'. Created and cultivated in Canada.

    A clever engaging story where at the centre are women of various cultures, all played by Tatiana Maslany. A Saskatchewan born and bred actor who has shown time and time again that her work not only stands up to the big leagues, but also shines bright. Not to mention the clever writing, wicked cinematography and killer production team along with a fantastic cast of Canadian heavy hitters, like Rosemary Dunsmore. Orphan Black is a tour de force.

    The world... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel